Frequently Asked Questions 

Why should I hire a Birth Doula?

A Birth Doula clarifies the labor stages and guides you in communication with your medical team of doctors, nurses, or midwives. She fosters tranquility and is trained to support you during labor with soothing techniques to ease discomfort and promote safe progress. As labor draws near, a doula coaches expectant birthing families on comfort and relaxation techniques, offers nurturing emotional support, provides information on labor and the birth, and offers information about options and medical procedures available during labor. While other staff on your medical team will need to tend to other patients, a doula never leaves your side. 

 

How do I choose the doula that is best for me? 

You and your partner discuss and decide what you are looking for in a doula; what services, role, price range, and additional services you would like.

How early should I hire a doula and what services does a doula provide before the baby is born?  

It is never too early to hire a doula, and the ideal time to hire one is 5-6 months before your estimated due date. Experienced doulas book early and quickly; repeat birthing families often book their doula on the day their pregnancy is confirmed!  

Will a doula sit with me at home or meet me at the hospital during labor? 

Your doula will "labor sit" with you by telephone during early labor until she joins you in your home or at the hospital. It is your preference whether she joins you at home or the hospital once labor is established. For scheduled hospital procedures, like an induction or a scheduled C-section your doula will meet you at the hospital by the agreed upon time whether night or day.

Can I benefit from a doula if I am considering a pain medication?

Yes. A doula is beneficial assisting with planned mediated or non-medicated births. Some expectant mothers prefer no pain medications, others want to begin with no medications, but reserve the right to change that decision. Others choose a planned medicated birth. A doula offers information on all procedures, including pain medications and potential side effects, and interventions. She will discuss options with you and your partner and facilitate a dialogue between you, your partner, and hospital staff. She will translate medical terms and proposed procedures. Your doula’s goal is to advise, support, and champion your decisions. She appreciates that birth preferences may change. The choice to use pain medication or not is up to you. 

What happens if the baby comes early or late? 

Once you retain your doula, she is committed to serving you whether your baby is born before or after the estimated due date.

Will my health insurance pay for reimburse or birth doula services?

Some insurance companies will reimburse for doula services as ‘out of network’ care services. For more information, please contact your insurance company.